‘A disruptive solution to pollution’: introducing edible packaging

An alternative to plastic that can be composted (and even consumed) has won an award for innovation

Dr Anne Lamp (visualized listed below) has created a system to transform agricultural residues into a variety of plastics, which in turn can be safely reintegrated into the food supply chain. The process can cut carbon emissions by 87 per cent compared to traditional plastics production– and it guarantees to compete on cost, too.

Now quick forward a few years: the plastics still there– some of it, anyhow– and now you happily chuck it in the compost bin, safe in the understanding that in a few weeks itll be on your vegetable spot, or the councils parks, not doing anything however good. Hell, you can even consume it too, if you have a mind to.

There you are, unloading the shopping, and silently cursing at the amount of plastic covering youre tossing in the recycling. Common, eh? And laborious, too.

Dr Anne Lamp has actually developed a system to change agricultural residues into a variety of plastics

Traceless makes plastic that you can gladly chuck it in the garden compost bin. Image: Traceless

Traceless exemplified that aim, he included.

Its an achievement which has won Traceless this years Green Alley Award. It acknowledges and commemorates start-ups which are effectively demonstrating the potential of the circular economy. The awards were founded in 2014 by Jan Patrick Schulz, CEO of the Landbell Group, a worldwide provider of environmental and chemical compliance options.

Combining her engineering background with her passion for a cradle to cradle lifecycle, Lamp has launched a brand-new company, Traceless, to commercialise the idea. Its currently drawing in a great deal of interest from potential consumers, eager to react to the growing demand to cut plastic waste– as well as meeting the EUs ban on some single-use plastics, which comes into force this year.

This years awards attracted 189 entries from start-ups in 30 nations. After cautious examination, these were whittled down to 6 finalists, each of whom pitched straight to a panel of professional judges at a vibrant virtual awards event, which is viewable here. In addition to Traceless, each of the finalists brought an appealing circular service to the table..

The Green Alley Award 2021 finalists

Carbonauten.

Carbonauten has set itself the task of turning waste wood into important plastic substitutes, guaranteeing the carbon is safely sequestered as it does so.

.

Image: Antoine Rault

Its an accomplishment which has won Traceless this years Green Alley Award. Go To the Green Alley Award website for more details.

Image: Kelly Repreza.

Main image: Nadja R.

Kleiderly turns some of the substantial number of garments wasted each year into clean, green alternative to oil-based thermoplastics.

Image: Bas Emmen.

Dimpora has developed environmentally-friendly breathable membranes for outside active wear.

Resync.

Resync seeks to play an essential function in matching supply and need in the B2B recycling space.

Dimpora.

Image: Waldemar Brandt.

TrusTrace is a brand-new digital platform helping to clarify the often opaque world of the style supply chain.

Kleiderly.

.

There you are, unloading the shopping, and calmly cursing at the quantity of plastic covering youre tossing in the recycling. Dr Anne Lamp (pictured below) has actually designed a system to change agricultural residues into a variety of plastics, which in turn can be securely reintegrated into the food supply chain. The process can cut carbon emissions by 87 per cent compared to standard plastics production– and it assures to compete on price, too.

Martin Wright is chair of Positive News and a judge on the Green Alley Award.

TrusTrace.

Image: Duy Hoang.

The Green Alley Award will return in 2022. Go To the Green Alley Award website for more information.

About the author