‘The Deliveroo of clothing repairs’: new app gives garments a second chance

By connecting customers to local seamsters, the Sojo app means individuals can get their clothing changed, repaired or upcycled in just a few clicks

Like so many developments, it was personal requirement that caused the creation of the Sojo app. Creator Josephine Philips (primary image, above), a 23-year-old graduate, wanted some of her clothing fixed and tailored, however her sewing abilities werent up to it.

” I found that going to a seamster was excessive effort and time, which implied I never ever got round to doing it,” she stated. “Sojo was created to resolve this.”

Users enter their postcode, pick a local seamster and the service they wait for and require collection of their garments by a bike carrier. The clothes will be returned within 5 days, all set to use. Sojo currently only runs around zones one and two of London, with plans to expand: Brighton and Bristol are next.

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A design in a transformed attire. Image: Sojo

” From food to taxis, were utilized to everything at our fingertips,” she said. “Given this, and the truth that many of us dont understand how to sew, Sojo is the perfect connector. It links gifted seamsters who have a craft that has been established over decades, and a younger generation that is complete of prospective because of their interest in sustainability.”.

One checks out: “I have had a set of pinstripe pants for the last year and never ever used them since the waist was too huge. I could not suggest Sojo more: it resembles getting a brand-new item of clothes.”

Seeking other methods to satisfy her sartorial imagination, Philips turned to pre-owned clothes: “I was a student, so they were an ideal mix of sustainable and affordable. Depop, I d constantly discover clothing that I loved that werent my size.

” But when I understood that shopping from these huge brand names didnt align with my feminist values– their company success was constructed off the back of the exploitation of majority ladies of colour garment workers– there was no going back.”

Around two years earlier, Philips made a conscious decision to try to prevent fast style. Before becoming conscious of its often-unethical supply chains and its ecological impact, Philips confesses she was an “passionate” customer.

Main image: Sojo creator Josephine Philips. Credit: Sojo.

The clothes will be returned within 5 days, all set to wear. Sojo presently just operates in and around zones one and 2 of London, with strategies to broaden: Brighton and Bristol are next.

It is the very first professional foray for Philips, whose previous experience consisted of waitressing, and interning at Depop. Introducing during a pandemic has actually been challenging– Sojo has actually needed to run a restricted service during lockdown. The app has drawn in some positive reviews already.

Philips is confident the app will prove appealing, especially to members of the Gen-Z and millennial generations..

Seeking other methods to satisfy her sartorial imagination, Philips turned to pre-owned clothes: “I was a student, so they were a perfect mix of budget friendly and sustainable. Depop, I d constantly discover clothing that I loved that werent my size. “Given this, and the truth that many of us do not understand how to stitch, Sojo is the ideal port.

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